New Year Goals Should Land Your Next Job #goalsetting to forward #careers

Think Clouds With Affirmative Statements
Standard

With every new year is another opportunity to restart your career.   How can you turn new goals for your current job into a solid track to your next promotion?

One of the most important January business planning activities is often overlooked.   Rested from a holiday break, we get back to work full of energy and ready to tear through our To-Do list, particularly if we have year end projects to finish.  Let’s step back and ask some questions about those activities.

  • Is the planned activity list going to help my company deliver better products or services?
  • Do I have any activities planned that will help me grow professionally?
  • What work will help me get promoted?

Creating a strategic plan in January for tactical activities for the entire year will benefit your employer and you personally. I suggest writing out five possible goals to share with your manager, seeking their input and approval.

Create Five Goals

Goals One, Two and Three – These goals should be structured to benefit your company.   How can you set a goal that will improve sales, productivity or overall profit?  Even at an entry level position, your activities should show a direct line contribution to profit for your corporation, or to improvement of services to your customers or constituents.  Putting the company first indicates to your supervisor that you understand and are inspired by the company mission.

Goal Four – Your next goal should be structured around personal improvement or professional development.   Although we arrive at the workplace with past experience or have received on-the-job training, there is always something more you can learn.  Perhaps you may look into a certification program that you can add to your resume.  Or maybe it is time to broaden your ability to contribute with a horizontal move into another practice area to expand your knowledge base.

Goal Five – The last goal should be written to show your desire to take on additional responsibilities.  Read through the job descriptions of the job you want.  What skill set is needed for this position?  How can you demonstrate that you have the knowledge or leadership skills to meet the challenges and responsibilities in this role.

Congratulations – you are ready to start a new year, and great opportunities lie ahead!  Get after it!

About Joyce Jarek: Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1®Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.  She enjoys mentoring her own team, and coaching new graduates who are entering the workforce and starting their first real job after college. To purchase First Job, visit www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html 

What You Will Find in First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates

Standard

I created a resource primarily for college grads that are entering the workforce in an office environment at an entry level. But First Job provides tools and tips that can apply to anyone in a professional setting. At some point we all start out in an entry-level position.  Your career may begin working in an office, a laboratory, or a shop floor.  Perhaps you are sales representatives, or an account manager working in a retail environment.   Although my readers work in many industries, there is some common ground for all of us.  We need to communicate well.  We have to work in teams. We are expected to perform.  We have profit and loss responsibilities for business, or may even be given the responsibility for someone’s life.  The consequences of improper action are serious.

The book discusses items that a recruiter or hiring manager may not have told you about. They sold you on the company through stories about culture, experience, pay and progression.   You are trained in a special course of study, and so far have survived high school, college and family relationships. You haven’t lived on a deserted island so you basically know how to get along with people. What you may not be prepared for are the new work rules and the complexities of coworker relationships, so we will concentrate heavily on team interaction. No one really teaches you the basics in simple terms. After reading this book, you will find yourself more prepared to succeed at work.

Online credit card payments accepted for $7.00 plus shipping. I also have a bulk discount for departmental managers. To purchase First Job, email me at jmihalik@hlpsum1.com and I will send you an invoice.

I also invite you to join the LinkedIn Group called First Job After College, and share your experiences regarding funny “First Day” stories, or ask questions about what to expect on your first day, and receive advice from experienced workers.

About Joyce Jarek: Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1® Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.  She enjoys mentoring her own team, and coaching new graduates who are entering the workforce and starting their first real job after college.

Devon’s First Day of Work – What is Your Story? ( #postgradlife #jobhunt #firstjob #graduation2015 )

Handsome man in business attire
Standard

Devon was so excited to have a job offer come through. Best email ever received!   All the work he had put into college was finally paying off. He will have enough money to buy more than a burrito at Chipotle, books and beer money.   He was eligible for a car loan without a cosigner, and could pick up his first new car next week. Aahh – it will be nice to have a “real” grownup apartment away from campus too! Once he gave his verbal to the recruiter before Spring break, he thought he could cruise for a while and enjoy springtime on campus.

Last week, more emails began to roll in from his new employer. Every time he opened them, he felt apprehensive.  His parents had helped him to fill out that monster form for the FAFSA, but this seemed worse. The company sent documents weekly and expected a response right away. He felt like he was agreeing to terms at the new company that he didn’t understand, and wondered how it would affect him later.

Devon’s story may sound very familiar to you. It certainly reflected my story. I remember sitting down with a HR representative who gave me a pen and said “sign here”!  The only explanation provided was either “you have no choice” (code of conduct policy), or, “this one will be good for you” (enrolling into a 401K plan).

At some point we all start out in an entry-level position and meet new people and are handed new assignments. The first time you start a “real” job is the most unsettling.   Your career may begin working in an office, a laboratory, or a shop floor.  Perhaps you accepted a position as  a sales representative, or an account manager, or working in a retail environment.   There is common ground.  We need to communicate well.  We have to work in teams. We are expected to perform.  We have profit and loss responsibilities for business, or may even be given the responsibility for someone’s life.  The consequences of improper action could be serious.   What if I do the wrong thing, and will I even know?

Graduates are trained with skills in an area of study, but understanding company work rules and the complexities of coworker relationships will be new.  In my experience with interns and new hires, here are some common questions I encounter:

From Devon:

  • When can I have a day off of work?
  • Am I allowed to talk to employees outside of my department?
  • What is my assignment and when is it due?

From the hiring manager:

  • Why doesn’t Devon respond to emails?
  • How much time do I need to spend with him the first week?
  • What work shall I give him to get started, without overwhelming him?

Likely, everyone will be a little nervous.  Many companies have new-hire training programs.   However, no one can really predict or train on how department relationships and work assignments will be managed – each situation is unique.  My advice to the new hire –  be friendly, ask questions regarding what is expected of you, get busy right away, and listen closely.

I invite you to join the LinkedIn Group called First Job After College, and share your experiences regarding funny “First Day” stories, or ask questions about what to expect on your first day, and receive advice from experienced workers.

About Joyce Jarek: Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1® Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.  She enjoys mentoring her own team, and coaching new graduates who are entering the workforce and starting their first real job after college. To purchase First Job, visit www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html About Joyce Jarek: Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1® Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.  She enjoys mentoring her own team, and coaching new graduates who are entering the workforce and starting their first real job after college. To purchase First Job, visit www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html

How To Choose A Career Book

Standard

cropped-img_18951.jpg

There are thousands of career books on the market in the self-help category.  We often read books about how to achieve something we desire: I want to be 20 lbs lighter, I wish I had a high-paying job, or I want to have less stress in my life.   We gravitate to the ideal state and want to read about what it will be like when we get there.  I suggest that the best chance for eventually realizing this dream, is to start from where you are today, taking one step at a time.  The book you need is the one that gets you started.
Many of us are looking for tips  on how to advance in our career, find a new job, or become a better manager. A book with high impact will stress slow but steady improvements, starting with the job or skills that you have right now.

To find the right book, I suggest a quick self assessment:
1) What job do I have today? 
Are you an individual contributor or a manager of others?  How many years of work experience do you have?  What would be the next likely move for you?  If you are in an entry-level position, then reading a book intended for C-Suite executives may leave you confused about how to improve productivity and performance in your cubicle tomorrow morning.  If you are a mid-level manager, then you already come with a set of your own experiences which may go beyond the author’s recommendations.
2) What problems are you having at work today?
Take some time to study your environment at work.  Do you feel your place of employment or the people you are working with are holding you back?  Are you holding yourself back? Often our thoughts about others and our work location can give us the biggest tips on what we need to concentrate on personally.  How can a personal change impact the way I am viewed or treated at the company?   By exploring this line of questioning,  you probably can quickly identify what work skills need improvement.  If your desk at work looks like my teenage son’s bedroom, search for books about organization, productivity and time management.  If you are having trouble connecting to coworkers, search for books on teamwork and continuous improvement.  Identify what appears to be an external problem, and then internalize it.
3) What kind of learner am I?
Do you like short stories or thoughtful reads in small print?  Do you like the theory or fact-based evidence about success, or would you prefer light stories?  Would you enjoy reading about how others achieved success, or do you want the author to talk directly to you? The book that you are most likely to finish, is probably the right purchase for you, even if it is slightly off-topic.  You will retain the material and find something to take away, if you enjoyed reading it.
Congratulations!  Just by doing this short assessment, you have taken the first step  forward in your career.  You have identified what you want to work on, and can begin to search book titles.  I suggest reading a preview for each book where the title appeals to your situation while keeping in mind the type of style you desire.  Most booksellers allow you to read the first few pages for free, and you can determine the style, tempo and subject matter from what the author leads with in the first few pages.  That is how I wrote my book.   If the preview is short and to the point, the book will be to.  If the preview is personable or thought provoking,  so will be the next 20 chapters.
Good luck and connect with me online!

About Joyce Jarek:
Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1® Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.  She enjoys mentoring her own team, and coaching new graduates who are entering the workforce and starting their first real job after college. To purchase First Job, visit www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html

First Job: The Transition Series Video – Graduates Prepare for Your First Job!

White Letters First Job with red background
Standard

Spring 2015 Graduates have entered their last semester and the end of their college career is in sight.  Congratulations!

Watch Joyce Jarek’s YouTube Video series about transitioning from the college environment to the workforce.

Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1, Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates. To purchase, visit www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html

Can I Shop on #CyberMonday during #Worklife ? Advice about #jobs & #IT policies

computer screen image
Standard

With Thanksgiving and Black Friday behind us, most of us will be picking up coffee on the way into work Monday morning with five days of work in front of us.   However, the Monday after Thanksgiving can also have a “holiday-feel” as retailers hype up Cyber Monday – supposedly THE DAY to shop online.  If you are tempted to browse in between meetings, have you considered whether it is OK to shop online at work?

Every workplace has different norms and policies.  What is your company’s IT policy?  Using company hardware or the web  interface for personal use is often strictly prohibited, or at best, it can only be used for a limited time during the day.  Most companies will have the capability to monitor every email, every website visited, and all documents created and stored on your computer.  One time I called the help desk and the service representative asked me if I owned a Harley (which I do). He had tracked the websites I visited where I was looking for new shocks for the bike. Cyber attacks are on the rise and the company has every right to protect their equipment, their information and intellectual property.  Company security is everyone’s responsibility – not just the IT department, and your mobile device, tablet or laptop may become a gateway for hackers.

In addition to the cyber security issues, we need to be mindful of keeping up our productivity as the holiday season kicks off.  What do you need to accomplish before the work year ends?  Most work place activity slows down to a crawl during the last two weeks of December, so this is your time to kick it in high gear and wrap up some projects.

I suggest making your Cyber Monday wish list tonight, and hitting the GO button when you get home.  The good news about Cyber Monday is that it lasts until 11:59 p.m.  I wish you a great start to the holidays, and if you decide to shop online on Cyber Monday, here is a quick link to get you started!  www.cybermonday.com

 

 

Why I wrote First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates

Red book jacket with word cloud and author name
Standard

Hello Readers:
I recently released my first book “First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.” The book relays personal experiences from a 27 year business career through four fictional characters, Kelsey, Devon, Jake and Donna that find themselves in tricky business situations and provides advice on how to prevent them or respond responsibly.  I made a lot of stupid mistakes in my career, and have always kept a journal to remind myself not to do them again.  I hope readers will recognize when they are in a similar situation and have a strong reference point on how to navigate through it.

The market is saturated with heavy reference information available for professionals with five to fifteen years of experience who are ready for leadership positions, but few books concentrate on early career progression for both men and women.  The average 23 year old is just trying to settle in, have fun and enjoy their new life, and put the heavy reading away for a while.

First Job can be read in less than two hours but can impact a new professional during the first two years of work, which is often the most critical for maintaining employment since many employers consider this your trial period.

There is order information and accompanying aids at www.hlpsum1.com.  The  reference worksheets will aid the reader in assessing how they spend their time, and whether they are a top performer and ready for a promotion out of their entry level position.