What You Will Find in First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates

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I created a resource primarily for college grads that are entering the workforce in an office environment at an entry level. But First Job provides tools and tips that can apply to anyone in a professional setting. At some point we all start out in an entry-level position.  Your career may begin working in an office, a laboratory, or a shop floor.  Perhaps you are sales representatives, or an account manager working in a retail environment.   Although my readers work in many industries, there is some common ground for all of us.  We need to communicate well.  We have to work in teams. We are expected to perform.  We have profit and loss responsibilities for business, or may even be given the responsibility for someone’s life.  The consequences of improper action are serious.

The book discusses items that a recruiter or hiring manager may not have told you about. They sold you on the company through stories about culture, experience, pay and progression.   You are trained in a special course of study, and so far have survived high school, college and family relationships. You haven’t lived on a deserted island so you basically know how to get along with people. What you may not be prepared for are the new work rules and the complexities of coworker relationships, so we will concentrate heavily on team interaction. No one really teaches you the basics in simple terms. After reading this book, you will find yourself more prepared to succeed at work.

Online credit card payments accepted for $7.00 plus shipping. I also have a bulk discount for departmental managers. To purchase First Job, email me at jmihalik@hlpsum1.com and I will send you an invoice.

I also invite you to join the LinkedIn Group called First Job After College, and share your experiences regarding funny “First Day” stories, or ask questions about what to expect on your first day, and receive advice from experienced workers.

About Joyce Jarek: Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1® Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.  She enjoys mentoring her own team, and coaching new graduates who are entering the workforce and starting their first real job after college.

Devon’s First Day of Work – What is Your Story? ( #postgradlife #jobhunt #firstjob #graduation2015 )

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Devon was so excited to have a job offer come through. Best email ever received!   All the work he had put into college was finally paying off. He will have enough money to buy more than a burrito at Chipotle, books and beer money.   He was eligible for a car loan without a cosigner, and could pick up his first new car next week. Aahh – it will be nice to have a “real” grownup apartment away from campus too! Once he gave his verbal to the recruiter before Spring break, he thought he could cruise for a while and enjoy springtime on campus.

Last week, more emails began to roll in from his new employer. Every time he opened them, he felt apprehensive.  His parents had helped him to fill out that monster form for the FAFSA, but this seemed worse. The company sent documents weekly and expected a response right away. He felt like he was agreeing to terms at the new company that he didn’t understand, and wondered how it would affect him later.

Devon’s story may sound very familiar to you. It certainly reflected my story. I remember sitting down with a HR representative who gave me a pen and said “sign here”!  The only explanation provided was either “you have no choice” (code of conduct policy), or, “this one will be good for you” (enrolling into a 401K plan).

At some point we all start out in an entry-level position and meet new people and are handed new assignments. The first time you start a “real” job is the most unsettling.   Your career may begin working in an office, a laboratory, or a shop floor.  Perhaps you accepted a position as  a sales representative, or an account manager, or working in a retail environment.   There is common ground.  We need to communicate well.  We have to work in teams. We are expected to perform.  We have profit and loss responsibilities for business, or may even be given the responsibility for someone’s life.  The consequences of improper action could be serious.   What if I do the wrong thing, and will I even know?

Graduates are trained with skills in an area of study, but understanding company work rules and the complexities of coworker relationships will be new.  In my experience with interns and new hires, here are some common questions I encounter:

From Devon:

  • When can I have a day off of work?
  • Am I allowed to talk to employees outside of my department?
  • What is my assignment and when is it due?

From the hiring manager:

  • Why doesn’t Devon respond to emails?
  • How much time do I need to spend with him the first week?
  • What work shall I give him to get started, without overwhelming him?

Likely, everyone will be a little nervous.  Many companies have new-hire training programs.   However, no one can really predict or train on how department relationships and work assignments will be managed – each situation is unique.  My advice to the new hire –  be friendly, ask questions regarding what is expected of you, get busy right away, and listen closely.

I invite you to join the LinkedIn Group called First Job After College, and share your experiences regarding funny “First Day” stories, or ask questions about what to expect on your first day, and receive advice from experienced workers.

About Joyce Jarek: Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1® Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.  She enjoys mentoring her own team, and coaching new graduates who are entering the workforce and starting their first real job after college. To purchase First Job, visit www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html About Joyce Jarek: Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1® Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.  She enjoys mentoring her own team, and coaching new graduates who are entering the workforce and starting their first real job after college. To purchase First Job, visit www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html

First Job: The Transition Series Video – Graduates Prepare for Your First Job!

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Spring 2015 Graduates have entered their last semester and the end of their college career is in sight.  Congratulations!

Watch Joyce Jarek’s YouTube Video series about transitioning from the college environment to the workforce.

Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1, Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates. To purchase, visit www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html

Coming Soon – Last Three Best Workdays of the Year, Improve #cubiclelife #worklife , #Career and #productivity

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Happy Holidays to all of my readers! Congratulations – you made it through the work year and accomplished your goals.  Given how Christmas and Hanukah fall on the 2014 calendar, it is tempting to extend winter break from now until January 5th. However, opportunity and award awaits those who save their paid time off for the months ahead and trek down to the office.

Let’s look at the top five productivity metrics for the last three workdays of the year:

  1. Less traffic lightens the commute. If you typically leave at 7:30am and return home at 6:00, this 10.5 hour day can likely shrink to 9.5 hour day with a 10% gain in your personal life.
  2. Few or No Meetings – do you celebrate when a meeting ends 15 minutes early because you just gained back 3% of your workday? Your calendar will be refreshingly clear and calm – offering more time to organize, clean up your work area and clear your head for the new year.
  3. Your employer will likely gift you with an opportunity to leave early on New Years Eve.  You can get paid for 100% of the workday with 75% of the effort.
  4. Reduce your unread or unanswered emails by 100%. Create a folder in Outlook named “Respond Soon” and add any issues to Task lists that can’t be resolved because your coworkers are out.  You can address them after January 5th.
  5. If you receive 100 emails a day, and 25% are daily email subscriptions, you can cut out 9,125 clicks in 2015 by taking an extra moment to unsubscribe from email notifications. Removal of these unhelpful distractions will allow you to concentrate on what matters going forward.

If these three performance-enhancing days can improve your overall well-being, then fill the new coffee mug up with a jolt of caffeine, pack a light lunch (not a bad time to start that diet), and immerse yourself into the serenity of your quiet work world.

Joyce Jarek Mihalik is a business leader in the real estate industry, creator of HlpSum1, Inc., and author of First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates. To purchase, visit www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html

Can I Shop on #CyberMonday during #Worklife ? Advice about #jobs & #IT policies

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With Thanksgiving and Black Friday behind us, most of us will be picking up coffee on the way into work Monday morning with five days of work in front of us.   However, the Monday after Thanksgiving can also have a “holiday-feel” as retailers hype up Cyber Monday – supposedly THE DAY to shop online.  If you are tempted to browse in between meetings, have you considered whether it is OK to shop online at work?

Every workplace has different norms and policies.  What is your company’s IT policy?  Using company hardware or the web  interface for personal use is often strictly prohibited, or at best, it can only be used for a limited time during the day.  Most companies will have the capability to monitor every email, every website visited, and all documents created and stored on your computer.  One time I called the help desk and the service representative asked me if I owned a Harley (which I do). He had tracked the websites I visited where I was looking for new shocks for the bike. Cyber attacks are on the rise and the company has every right to protect their equipment, their information and intellectual property.  Company security is everyone’s responsibility – not just the IT department, and your mobile device, tablet or laptop may become a gateway for hackers.

In addition to the cyber security issues, we need to be mindful of keeping up our productivity as the holiday season kicks off.  What do you need to accomplish before the work year ends?  Most work place activity slows down to a crawl during the last two weeks of December, so this is your time to kick it in high gear and wrap up some projects.

I suggest making your Cyber Monday wish list tonight, and hitting the GO button when you get home.  The good news about Cyber Monday is that it lasts until 11:59 p.m.  I wish you a great start to the holidays, and if you decide to shop online on Cyber Monday, here is a quick link to get you started!  www.cybermonday.com

 

 

Escaping Confinement – Tales of #Cubicle Life #Postgradlife

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Recently I have joined the community of readers on Twitter and Instagram who read and post about the routine of their new life after college.   This group of young professionals face the new reality of being cubicle dwellers – spending almost one-third of their lives at work surrounded by four fake walls.  I remember these days – it felt a lot like being a freshman in a dorm – the lack of privacy minus the fun.  Many of you are faced with mundane and entry level tasks for hours on end and are experiencing a new boredom and tiredness from the routine of having to go into the office – every day, every week- no breaks.

I encourage you to get up and walk around with purpose. Create a mission each day to learn something new by networking with someone in a different department, ask to be included in a task force or committee where you will work on a special project, or as one follower commented in #postgradlife, live on the edge and go to the bathroom on a different floor.  Walk by and observe what is on bulletin boards and say hello to someone new.

The best way to stay motivated is to have multiple short-term projects along with your daily or monthly work. If 50 to 80% of your job repeats on a routine basis, then you should break up the routine with other assignments that only last 2 to 3 months. Part of managing yourself is being able to manage up. If your boss doesn’t prepare assignments in this manner take it upon yourself to ask him for some project work. This will ensure that you’re constantly learning something new or have an opportunity to build a skill set in a new area. When you spend so much time in one place, over 40 hours a week, you should enjoy it, or work will become boring and depressing.

For more tips on how to stay fresh, pick up my ebook First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.  Here is a link to Amazon, Ingram and B&N.  www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html

Staying Employed is Key to Avoid Living with Parents

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A 2014 Gallup survey indicated that 14 percent of all kids graduating from college are living with parents. They continue to rely on their parents for support, even if they find immediate employment post-graduation. With Fall commencement nearing, many parents may find their graduate back in their old bedroom.

Who suffers financially? Mostly the parents who are surprised to find their kids returning home after college graduation because they either can’t find a job or have a job with wages so low that they can’t afford to live on their own while paying down college debt. About 260,000 people who had a college or professional degree made at or below the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour last year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Boomers had hopes to stash away more money in those last few crunch years before retirement but instead must use their extra income to support their children who by now should be financially independent.

Faced with this growing reality, a 2014 article in Fortune magazine discussed how parents are helping their kids network and find a job, and are struggling to determine how far is too far in assisting their graduate.

We don’t magically change once receiving a degree, but hopefully have developed technical competency and communication skills before entering the workforce.

However, the emphasis in college was likely on technical skills development, but many young adults arrive at their first job post degree with a lack of communication and social skills. Colleges include courses on presentation and writing skills in their curriculum, however, training usually stops there, and today’s new employees are left to navigate day-to-day coworker interactions by drawing upon their short brush with socially-accepted work behavior from an internship. Understanding the soft skills can be key to long-term employment.

What kind of support should we ask for from our anxious parents? Ask your parents to share some of their early career experiences but stand on your own by staying employed.

I recently released my first book “First Job: A Personal Career Guide for Graduates.” You will find my personal experiences told through four fictional characters that find themselves in tricky business situations and provides advice on how to prevent them or respond responsibly.

First Job can be read in less than two hours but can impact a new professional during the first two years of work, which is often the most critical for maintaining employment.

For tips on navigating work life and advancing a business career,  visit www.hlpsum1.com/first-job.html to purchase First Job.