The 5-to-1 Plan for Company Meetings

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Whether you are just gaining momentum at work or your energy burst in January is starting to fizzle, your company’s yearly planning meeting can be the time to refocus your work plans, goals and strategy. It’s a perfect opportunity for networking, training and collaboration.  I have some suggestions on how to make the best of it.

Here is a simple plan that you can keep at your fingertips.

Think of five People you want to get to know better. Whether they are coworkers within your group, recent hires at the company, or an executive in a different department, make a point to shake hands and ask, “What interests you most about this year’s meetings?” Be prepared to carry the conversation until it begins to flow, and then go out on a limb and ask a personal question. You may find a common interest to form a bond from.

Avoid the following four No’s: 

Don’t get caught checking your cell phone for messages and emails while a speaker is talking. All of the people who are dutifully complying with the “no tech zone” rule are watching YOU check your phone.

Don’t indulge in too many beverages! Something about all-day exhausting meetings and a “free-to-you” company tab may make whooping it up seem harmless, but, a little self-control at night will help you to be wide awake and ready in the morning.

Approach the meeting without negativity. Often we think we are too busy to spend a day or two strategizing. But this is an opportunity to get creative. Bring a blank notebook with you and write down anything that comes to mind. This will keep you focused on the speaker and presentations, and you may just come up with a new idea , product or process improvement that your company needs.

Remember an old adage – if you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all. This is a time to support company goals and the people that are helping the company to grow or change. Keep disparaging remarks to yourself. Negative Nancy is not on the invite list.

Arrive with three Goals for the meeting and leave with at least two Impressions. Formulate your thoughts of what you would like to accomplish during this time, and commit to coming away with two impressions of people, ideas or plans. Take a lessons-learned approach and be prepared to answer the question your boss is sure to ask – what was your biggest take away?

Finally, when you arrive back at your desk, begin to execute immediately one Action Item that you promised yourself to do or accomplish as a result of the session. It is important to start on it right away. As time passes, the feeling in your gut may dissipate. Go with your gut – after having a day or two filled with inspiration, be confident that it’s the right move.

Stand out during the goal setting process – Step 2

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Most companies have a form or a system where employees memorialize their goals.   Sometimes the system or format itself provides so much structure that devising goals becomes more about documentation than ties to actual performance.  Completing your goals is another task you can check off of your list! The act of goal setting provides many opportunities for networking and visibility that most people rarely take advantage of.  The author of this blog is also guilty of this!  View your goals as a contract, between you and your supervisor, another department, or your “customer” which can be an internal or an external customer.  Take the opportunity to share your goal “contract”, and ask for feedback on whether or not the goal and the activities documented will provide value.  By including your peers or your customers in the goal setting process, they will automatically be more vested in helping you achieve those goals, especially if they know they will benefit.